Biggest Offseason Priorities and Targets for Boston Celtics

Contrary to what you may have learned in school, there’s nothing wrong with being an overachiever. Just ask the Boston Celtics.

It took them just four years to rise from the ashes of the Paul Pierce-Kevin Garnett era to the top of the East, with 53 wins and a spot in the conference finals to show for their efforts.

The way things ended—in five games against the Cleveland Cavaliers—was anything but pretty, but as The Ringer’s Kevin O’Connor explained, the C’s remain in an enviable position over both the short and long term:

“Boston can essentially go in any direction. The team won 53 games this season, has one of the game’s top head coaches in Brad Stevens, went all the way to the Eastern Conference finals, has a ton of young talent, owns the no. 1 pick, and can easily create cap space to sign a max free agent this summer. President of basketball operations Danny Ainge holds an amazing hand.”

What should Trader Danny do with those cards? More importantly, will any of his potential plays make a difference so long as LeBron James still reigns supreme over the East?

Here’s a look at five of the most critical scenarios facing the C’s this summer.

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Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2711914-biggest-offseason-priorities-and-targets-for-boston-celtics

George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke

Love Them or Hate Them, NFL Celebrations Are Back, and Players Are Ecstatic

We are about to enter, or perhaps re-enter, an era in which the NFL stops taking itself so seriously. Where the commissioner isn’t solely consumed with punishing players. Where its players can celebrate on the field. Where the league loosens its belt, puts its feet up on the couch and chills the hell out. 

Earlier this week, the NFL decided to relax its restrictions on player celebrations, and the players love it. Not all of them, for sure, but most. Players have long felt the NFL was far too uptight about player celebrations and needed to relax the rules.

“I think guys will love it,” said former running back Justin Forsett, who played in the NFL for nine years before retiring last year, to B/R. “I would expect them to be more creative and have more fun.”

Then Forsett added, only half joking: “There will be more practice celebrations in the mirror and [during] practice.”

Across the NFL, current and former players say the rule adaptation is a long time coming.

Terrell Owens, perhaps the greatest celebrant in league history, tweeted:

“It’s amazing,” Pittsburgh receiver Antonio Brown told reporters about the rule change after Steelers practice Wednesday.

Last year, after scoring a touchdown in Week 6 against the Philadelphia Eagles, Washington tight end Vernon Davis mimicked a basketball jump shot using the crossbar as his hoop. It led to a 15-yard penalty and a short kickoff for Philadelphia, which returned the kick for a touchdown. Davis was fined $12,000. If he did the same thing this fall, he wouldn’t be penalized.

“Guys want to celebrate, they want to make it fun,” Davis told Master Tesfatsion of the Washington Post. “That’s what this game is—it’s all about having fun. Go out there, you don’t want to be uptight. You want to have fun and do things within the realm of your team and be in compliance, but at the same time, you want to have fun. I think that’s one thing we have to work on as players. We have to make sure that we’re doing everything that we can do to make sure that we can keep it this way so that they won’t come back and say, ‘Hey, we’re going to take it away from you guys again.’ If we just work together and do things the right way, then we can keep it.”

The NFL’s new policy will allow players to use the ground in their celebrations, involve other players and use the football as a prop. The No Fun League is fun again.

This is long overdue, and the decision to change course isn’t just practical. It’s also highly tactical.

Throughout much of the Goodell era, the league has become far too enamored with punishment and dominance over its players. We saw this in the massive overreaction the NFL had to allegations of Tom Brady deflating footballs. It’s also evident in how the league fines players if they wear the wrong socks or unlicensed hats. Players also have been fined for twerking or wearing the wrong color cleats. This left the NFL looking draconian and petty.

The league forgot that it didn’t exist just to serve the fans, but also to promote the game’s stars—the players. Not the commissioner. Not the owners. Not the coaches. The players.

There are a number of fans (though not all) who want to see players shake their asses. Or use the football as a cellphone. Or dab. Or eat popcorn. Or do whatever the hell they want.

Sure, not everyone in the NFL agrees. With an incredible lack of self-awareness, Bengals coach Marvin Lewis said he was unhappy with the changes.

“I’m not for that at all,” Lewis told reporters. “We had a good standard, and the whole standard has always been, you want to teach people how to play the game the correct way and go about it the correct way, and that’s not a very good example for young people.

“The rules were changed for a reason, and I thought we had a good outcome,” he said. “Again, this is a team game, and … I don’t understand why we want to give in to individual celebrations.”

Lewis’ Bengals, of course, drafted running back Joe Mixon, who was videotaped punching a woman in the face while at Oklahoma. And they have long employed Adam “Pacman” Jones, who has had his share of legal troubles. What’s a worse example for kids? Brown moving his hips or Mixon throwing hands?

 

There’s another part of this that can’t be ignored. It’s the violence of football.

Some players have complained to me for years how if they’re going to get their brains pulverized and bones broken, then at least let them celebrate the way they want to. They see it as a sort of release and a reminder that they aren’t robots, but human beings playing an ugly game that can handicap them.

Sure, some of these celebrations will be ridiculous. Some will be absurd. And as Forsett said, you will see players almost rehearsing for them.

There will be media hot takes about how this will ruin the game, how players are punks who dance too much and how Bronko Nagurski would have never danced because he was a man’s man and didn’t need no damn dancing.

Will be it fun to watch?

Oh yeah.

    

Mike Freeman covers the NFL for Bleacher Report. Follow him on Twitter @mikefreemanNFL.

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2711568-love-them-or-hate-them-nfl-celebrations-are-back-and-players-are-ecstatic

Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner

Victor Cruz Says Giants Intentionally Limited His Production Last Season

Free-agent wide receiver Victor Cruz said Thursday he believes the New York Giants intentionally limited his production in 2016.

During an interview on 105.1 FM’s The Breakfast Club (h/t SNY), the veteran wideout presented his theory on how he was handled by the G-Men last season: ”I felt it all year long. Halfway through the year I’m ballin’, the other half I’m not getting the ball. And you’re just like, ‘What’s going on?’ It was like ‘OK, I see what’s happening. They don’t want me here anymore.’ A lot of people probably don’t know this … Let’s say I played well—was a 1,000-yard receiver last year—it would have been more difficult from a fan perspective to cut me.”

Cruz also suggested the Giants wanted to avoid paying him incentives in 2017: “If I played well, they owed me a ton of money that next year. So it was like, ‘Let’s get Cruz off the books.’”

However, Giants head coach Bob McAdoo said “there is no accuracy” to Cruz’s claims, per Bob Glauber of Newsday.

After missing most of 2014 and all of 2015 due to injury, Cruz appeared in 15 games last season, registering 39 receptions for 586 yards and one touchdown.

He ranked fourth on the team in catches behind wide receivers Odell Beckham Jr. and Sterling Shepard as well as tight end Will Tye, and he was third in receiving yardage behind OBJ and Shepard.

Cruz was targeted inconsistently in 2016, as he was targeted seven or more times in just five games.

The former undrafted free agent out of UMass is a Pro Bowler who topped 1,000 receiving yards for the Giants in both 2011 and 2012.

New York released the 30-year-old this offseason and replaced him with former New York Jets receiver Brandon Marshall.

Cruz has yet to sign with another team, but he has visited with the Carolina Panthers, Chicago Bears and Jacksonville Jaguars, per NFL.com.

Read more NFL news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2711778-victor-cruz-says-giants-intentionally-limited-his-production-last-season

Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke

David Price to Make Season Debut vs. White Sox After Elbow Injury

Boston Red Sox pitcher David Price will finally get his season started on Monday when he is activated off the disabled list. 

Red Sox manager John Farrell officially announced Price’s return against the Chicago White Sox on Monday, per ESPN’s Scott Lauber

Price was forced to begin the season on the DL after dealing with an elbow injury from the beginning of spring training. He was stuck throwing bullpen sessions and simulated games throughout April before finally making a rehab start at the end of May.

Price’s second rehab start at Triple-A Pawtucket came on Wednesday night. In two starts, he allowed 12 hits, nine runs (six earned) with eight strikeouts and two walks in 5.2 innings. 

Now, Price will finally get a chance to make an impact for the major league squad in his triumphant return to the Red Sox.

Although the 31-year-old is coming off one of the worst years of his career after posting a 3.99 ERA, he still had 17 wins and led the league with 230 innings pitched. The former Cy Young award winner is also just one year removed from posting an AL-best 2.45 ERA split between two teams in 2015.

Until this year, Price has also been extremely reliable on the mound while averaging about 233 innings over the last three seasons.

His return should provide a needed boost to a Red Sox rotation that ranks 18th in starters’ ERA (4.47) this season. Chris Sale and Eduardo Rodriguez are the only Boston starters with an ERA under 4.35.

With Price in just the second season of a seven-year deal worth over $200 million, the Red Sox will hope his injury problems are now behind him.  

Read more MLB news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2710836-david-price-to-make-season-debut-vs-white-sox-after-elbow-injury

Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen

LeBron James Has Become 1 of the NBA’s All-Time Greatest Dynasties

If LeBron James leads his Cleveland Cavaliers past the Golden State Warriors and earns the fourth ring of his Hall of Fame career, he may finally be finished chasing ghosts. But even if he falls on the NBA‘s biggest stage, he’ll have accomplished something few individuals in any team sport have ever been able to claim. 

After the series-clinching 135-102 victory over the Boston Celtics on Thursday, one in which he passed Michael Jordan to become the all-time leading scorer in playoff history, he’s truly become his own dynasty. 

That’s a designation typically reserved for the greatest teams, the ones who keep racking up championships and leaving all competitors in their proverbial dust. The Jordan-era Chicago Bulls were a dynasty, winning six titles in a single decade.

So too were Bill Russell’s Celtics. Lew Alcindor’s reign with the UCLA Bruins certainly qualifies, and we can’t overlook great runs in other sports—the New York Yankees from the late 1940s through the early ’60s and the Montreal Canadiens in the late ’50s are just a few examples. 

But James is redefining the term. 

He’s boasted an unrelenting stranglehold on his half of the Association for the better part of a decade, following up losses to the Orlando Magic (2009 Eastern Conference Finals) and Celtics (2010 Eastern Conference semifinals) by putting together a run like none other. This is now James’ seventh consecutive trip to the NBA Finals, which puts him—and James Jones, who’s ridden on his coattails all the while—in some rarified air. 

Properly contextualizing seven straight chances at the Larry O’Brien Trophy is nearly impossible. That doesn’t sound like too long a streak, especially because some of the trips have ended in failure.

But no one in modern NBA history has ever achieved such a feat. Members of Russell’s Celtics (Russell himself, as well as Sam Jones, Tom Heinsohn and others) earned even longer streaks, but they also played during an era in which a single series victory was the only advancement necessary. Jordan may have joined the club had he not tested his baseball chops.

Until James, that’s about everyone worth mentioning. 

Think about it this way: With James Jones now joining the club, only 19 players in NBA history have played in seven Finals. Jordan, Scottie Pippen, Wilt Chamberlain and Tim Duncan all fall just short, which means James has used a seven-year stretch to advance to the biggest stage more frequently than all but 18 other players in the history of this sport. 

And it gets better: Only five of the league’s 30 franchises—and we can even throw the defunct squads into the mix—have as many NBA Finals appearances in their history as James has in the last seven years. If that’s not the definition of a dynasty, what is? 

That’s not a rhetorical question. Maybe you don’t think just making the Finals is worthy of dynastic recognition. James does have glaring flaws on his postseason resume, thanks to his defeats at the hands of the San Antonio Spurs (2007 and 2014), Golden State Warriors (2015) and Dallas Mavericks (2011).

It’s a perfectly legitimate opinion…until you consider all the other factors that have gone into this run. 

Dynasties also inspire fear, and that’s exactly what James’ reign of terror has done to the Eastern Conference. Just consider Kyle Lowry’s words during his Toronto Raptors‘ second-round series against the Cavs. 

“They’ve got LeBron James,” the All-Star point guard told The Vertical’s Adrian Wojnarowski. “Nobody’s closing the gap on him. I mean, that’s it right there: They’ve got LeBron James and nobody’s closing the gap on him.”

Not only was the quote delivered in the midst of the series, but it came from the best player on a team that won 51 games during the regular season—the same number of victories Cleveland accumulated, though the defending champions earned the tiebreaker for the No. 2 seed. Even Lowry was resigned to the fact James could turn his level of play up another notch when games really mattered, effectively achieving invincibility during the first three rounds. 

But maybe you’re still not convinced. Unmitigated excellence leading up to the most important series and fear-inspiring play can’t sway you. In that case, how about the four-time NBA MVP’s adaptability? 

Though James has been surrounded by stars throughout this legendary streak—Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving with Cleveland, and Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade with the Miami Heat—he’s always been able to morph his game to the roster around him, showcasing malleability that’s rather uncommon in players of such prominent stature. 

He’s made the Finals as a basket-attacking, score-first stud, functioning as such during the beginning of his short-lived South Beach tenure. He became a sharpshooter at the end of the Miami era, almost refusing to take ill-advised shots and dazzling with his efficiency. Now, back with the Cavs, he’s allowed Irving to take over as a go-to scorer more frequently (despite averaging better than 32 points per game himself this postseason) while playing the Magic Johnson-esque type of basketball he always seemed born to play. 

Chameleons are typically found in less important roles. They might shift their style to fit in with the bench of a different organization.

At the risk of hyperbole, no star has ever changed his stripes this seamlessly on so many occasions. Chamberlain may be the one exception, but his decision to lead the league in assists during the 1967-68 campaign was met by defeat at the hands of Russell’s C’s in the Eastern Division Finals. James, on the other hand, just keeps winning.

Enjoy what you’re watching, because a run like this won’t happen again for quite some time. 

Functioning as the NBA’s best player through his late 20s and into his early 30s hasn’t been enough for James; his individual prowess and its ability to spark success on a team-oriented level has now transcended the very concept of dynasties. 

      

Adam Fromal covers the NBA for Bleacher Report. Follow him on Twitter: @fromal09.

Unless otherwise indicated, all stats from Basketball ReferenceNBA.comESPN.com or NBA Math and accurate heading into games on Thursday, May 25.

Read more Basketball news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2711913-lebron-james-has-become-1-of-the-nbas-all-time-greatest-dynasties

Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken

Victor Cruz, Bears Agree to 1-Year Contract After 7 Seasons with Giants

Once considered among the best slot receivers in the NFL, Victor Cruz will look to revive his career with the Chicago Bears after agreeing to terms on a one-year deal Thursday, the Bears announced

NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport first reported the news. 

The New York Giants released Cruz on Feb. 13 after he spent seven years with the team. He shared his reaction to the move with Uninterrupted:

Art Stapleton of the Record reported the deal was worth $2 million in base salary, with another $2 million in incentives. 

The 30-year-old rose relatively quickly from obscurity at the beginning of his NFL career. An undrafted free agent who joined the Giants in 2010, he caught 168 passes for 2,628 yards and 19 touchdowns between 2011 and 2012.

But as quickly as Cruz ascended, he fell back to earth with equal speed. Pro Football Focus showed how he steadily declined with each year after his Pro Bowl campaign in 2012:

ESPN.com’s Jordan Raanan provided another sobering statistic about Cruz’s overall production in the Big Apple:

Injuries hastened the decline. Cruz played six games in 2014 before suffering a season-ending patellar injury. He then missed the entire 2015 season after undergoing calf surgery.

In July 2016, Bleacher Report’s Brad Gagnon wrote Cruz’s patellar injury was particularly foreboding:

A study published in June by the American Journal of Sports Medicine, cataloging postoperative outcomes of orthopaedic procedures in NFL players, found only 50 percent of players returned after having surgery on torn patellar tendons. That’s particularly daunting considering that 79.4 percent of players returned to play after orthopaedic procedures in general, which makes patellar tendon repair an outlier. 

In fact, per that study, those recovering from patellar tendon surgery fared the worst “with respect to the return-to-play rate, career length after surgery, games played, and performance at one year and two-to-three years after surgery.”

Gagnon’s skepticism proved justified. Cruz caught 39 passes for 586 yards and a touchdown. Pro Football Focus graded him 99th (53.9) out of 115 qualified receivers, while Football Outsiders ranked him 75th in DYAR (defense-adjusted yards above replacement).

At this point in his career, it’s unlikely Cruz will ever be a Pro Bowl-caliber receiver again. He turns 31 in November, and the torn patellar paints further doubt on his long-term value.

Cruz will likely be an insurance policy for the Bears. Cameron Meredith played unexpectedly well in 2016, but beyond him, Chicago’s receiving corps has a few question marks.

Kevin White has appeared in four games since the team selected him with the seventh overall pick in the 2015 draft, and a shoulder injury limited Markus Wheaton to three games a year ago. The combination of Kendall Wright and Rueben Randle arrived after underwhelming—to varying degrees—stints with their previous teams.

And that’s to say nothing of the fact either Mike Glennon or Mitchell Trubisky will be the Bears’ starting quarterback.

Cruz—even with his injury history—brings some level of stability to what is shaping up to be an unpredictable offense in 2017.

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Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2692848-victor-cruz-bears-agree-to-1-year-contract-after-7-seasons-with-giants

Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans

DeSean Jackson Responds to OC Saying He Only Joined Buccaneers for Money

Tampa Bay Buccaneers offensive coordinator Todd Monken told reporters last week that DeSean Jackson signed with the team “because of the money,” and the veteran wideout offered a response on Tuesday.

Speaking to the media at organized team activities on Tuesday, Jackson said taking the highest offer on the table was a no-brainer.

“I think anybody—everybody sitting in this room—if you had a chance to get a pay rise or whatever, I think you would take the same addition,” he said, according to Pewter Report’s Mark Cook. “So, it’s really not all about money. It definitely plays a key part, but I play this game at a high level and you get rewarded for what you do. So, just going out there and putting it in on the field and once you do that, then [you get] the results.”

Jackson also said he’s not going to let perception dictate how he performs.

“I expect high expectations for myself. I don’t let anyone else really control that. I ask the same thing from myself, my family, people that work for me, so I understand that. One thing about myself is I’m a professional, I go out there and the results show for themselves. However someone feels, that’s how they feel. I know when it comes time to play games and I’m out there on the field, I’m going to give it all I’ve got to help my team win games.”

Jackson and the Bucs agreed to a three-year, $33.5 million deal, with $20 million guaranteed, shortly after free agency opened in March, and Monken made it clear last week that the 30-year-old wouldn’t be allowed to coast after cashing out.

“Don’t give me all that bull about you came here because of the weather and Jameis,” he said, per the Tampa Bay Times‘ Rick Stroud. “No. You came here because we paid you the most. You need to play like that. He gets that. He’s smart enough to understand that.”

While the pressure may already be on, Jackson is in a situation where he should flourish.

Jameis Winston is starting to develop into one of the league’s better young quarterbacks, and Mike Evans has entered an elite tier of receivers after racking up 3,578 yards and 27 touchdowns over his first three NFL seasons.

As a result, Jackson should have plenty of room to stretch the field and live up to his billing as a top-notch vertical threat a season after he led the league in yards per reception (17.9).   

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Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2711705-desean-jackson-responds-to-oc-saying-he-only-joined-buccaneers-for-money

Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins

Angela Magana Challenges Cris Cyborg to Fight After Punch at UFC Retreat

Angela Magana is ready to settle her beef with Cristiane “Cyborg” Justino inside the octagon. The UFC women’s bantamweight competitor took to Twitter on Wednesday to challenge Justino to a jujitsu matchup:

Magana’s tweet comes after Justino was arrested and charged with misdemeanor battery after allegedly attacking Magana at the 2017 UFC athlete summit. Nick Strickland of CagePages.com posted a video of the altercation Monday, which shows Justino telling Magana “you don’t respect nobody” before the situation turned physical. 

Magana has become a vocal antagonizer of Cyborg on social media, which was the impetus for the altercation. The two women were separated by UFC officials, and Magana was taken to a Las Vegas hospital to be treated for a minor face wound.

“This is a misdemeanor crime, which is the lowest of Nevada penalties,” Officer Larry Hadfield of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department told Steven Marrocco of MMA Junkie. “When they found probable cause to believe the crime had occurred, they cited that other individual. For us, it’s a very minor call, I guess you could say.”

Justino could face up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine if convicted. 

Magana and Justino fight in different weight classes, so settling this at a UFC event seems highly unlikely. 

Read more UFC news on BleacherReport.com

Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2711624-angela-magana-challenges-cris-cyborg-to-fight-after-punch-at-ufc-retreat

Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas

Ryan Braun Leaves Game vs. Diamondbacks with Calf Injury; Will Be Placed on DL

Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun left in the fourth inning of Thursday’s game against the Arizona Diamondbacks with tightness in his left calf.

Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported Braun will be placed on the disabled list.

Jesus Aguilar pinch hit for Braun in the bottom of the fourth inning. He was not involved in any defensive plays in the top of the fourth but has had a lingering calf issue for most of May.

This was only the sixth time Braun has been in the lineup this month, and he did not play in Wednesday’s loss to the Toronto Blue Jays. Braun also dealt with injuries to his forearm and trapezius earlier in the month.

Sunday’s loss to the Chicago Cubs was the first time he’d played since going on the disabled list May 12. The Brewers went 10-5 with Braun out of the lineup this month and are currently 25-21, sitting first in the NL Central.

Having the calf as a lingering problem isn’t going to do much to help him break out of a slowish start. Braun is hitting .265/.353/.529 with seven home runs and 19 runs batted in this season. 

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Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2711908-ryan-braun-leaves-game-vs-diamondbacks-with-calf-injury

Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente

Former Baylor, Kentucky HC Guy Morriss Announces Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Guy Morriss, a former NFL player who also served as the head coach at Baylor and Kentucky, told WKYT that he has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

“At first I couldn’t write my name,” Morriss said. “I could not write my name. I didn’t know my ABCs. I couldn’t do that little rhyme.”

He continued, “You wake up one day…everything connects. Next time, you get out of bed. … It’s just a day at a time.”

Morriss has tackled his treatment and therapy in the same way he approached his career, however.

“Guy takes it home with him. So if he doesn’t perform up to his standards on one particular task, he will go home and practice as though he was in a game,” Dr. Greg Jicha told WKYT. “He can see that there’s difficulty, and he works at it. He practices. And that’s incredibly good for his brain.”

Despite putting that work in, however, Morriss has accepted that his prognosis came with a bleak outlook.

“We’ve all kind of accepted it. Everybody knows what we’re dealing with,” he said. “The prognosis of beating it is not gonna be there for me.”‘

Morriss spent two seasons (2001-02) as the head coach at Kentucky and five seasons (2004-08) at Baylor. His NFL playing career included stints with the Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots, and he was an NFL assistant coach for the Patriots and Arizona Cardinals. He also spent time coaching at Valdosta State and Mississippi State. 

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Source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2711296-former-baylor-kentucky-hc-guy-morriss-announces-alzheimers-diagnosis

Jason Giambi Jose Cruz Bob Elliott Harry Hooper Cesar Cedeno Buck Ewing Ron Cey Jimmy Sheckard Mickey Cochrane Tommy Leach Sam Rice Ted Simmons Ichiro Suzuki Max Carey Fred McGriff George Sisler Tony Perez Gabby Hartnett Chet Lemon Luis Aparicio Kiki Cuyler Hugh Duffy Frank Chance Brian Downing John McGraw Vada Pinson Joe Tinker Gene Tenace King Kelly Johnny Evers Joe Sewell Tony Lazzeri Bobby Doerr Ellis Burks Hughie Jennings Tony Phillips Fielder Jones Larry Doby Larry Doyle Fred Lynn Bernie Williams Cupid Childs Mark Grace Toby Harrah Harry Stovey Edd Roush Orlando Cepeda Mike Cameron Johnny Damon Sam Thompson Babe Ruth Barry Bonds Ty Cobb Willie Mays Hank Aaron Honus Wagner Tris Speaker Stan Musial Rogers Hornsby Eddie Collins Ted Williams Mickey Mantle Lou Gehrig Rickey Henderson Mel Ott Mike Schmidt Frank Robinson Nap Lajoie Joe Morgan Cap Anson Alex Rodriguez Eddie Mathews Jimmie Foxx Al Kaline George Davis Cal Ripken Wade Boggs Carl Yastrzemski Roger Connor George Brett Dan Brouthers Roberto Clemente Joe DiMaggio Charlie Gehringer Jeff Bagwell Rod Carew Ken Griffey Robin Yount Chipper Jones Albert Pujols Sam Crawford Bill Dahlen Frank Thomas Arky Vaughan Pete Rose Paul Molitor Frankie Frisch Ed Delahanty Reggie Jackson Paul Waner Fred Clarke Johnny Bench Johnny Mize Billy Hamilton Lou Whitaker Harry Heilmann Brooks Robinson Luke Appling Barry Larkin Derek Jeter Tony Gwynn Jesse Burkett Bobby Grich Carlton Fisk Duke Snider Edgar Martinez Larry Walker Jim Thome Alan Trammell Eddie Murray Jim Edmonds Ivan Rodriguez Pee Wee Reese Ron Santo Gary Carter Manny Ramirez Craig Biggio Rafael Palmeiro Willie McCovey Kenny Lofton Tim Raines Ozzie Smith Ernie Banks Frank Baker Roberto Alomar Al Simmons Gary Sheffield Mark McGwire Reggie Smith Jackie Robinson Goose Goslin Joe Jackson Joe Cronin Scott Rolen Ryne Sandberg Dwight Evans Yogi Berra Jake Beckley Graig Nettles Harmon Killebrew Dick Allen Keith Hernandez Willie Keeler Buddy Bell Sal Bando Willie Randolph Bobby Wallace Jimmy Wynn Dave Winfield Sammy Sosa Jeff Kent Mike Piazza Sherry Magee Jack Glasscock Andruw Jones Ken Boyer Richie Ashburn Bid McPhee Zack Wheat Willie Stargell Will Clark Todd Helton Billy Williams Willie Davis Vladimir Guerrero Bobby Abreu Darrell Evans Bobby Bonds Hank Greenberg Andre Dawson John Olerud Elmer Flick Joe Medwick Lou Boudreau Billy Herman Joe Torre Joe Kelley Bill Terry Robin Ventura Jack Clark Joe Gordon Stan Hack Carlos Beltran Bill Dickey Enos Slaughter Bob Johnson Jimmy Collins Norm Cash Minnie Minoso Jason Giambi